A Typical Megalithic Menhir 7 Feet in Height Found at Basrur

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A Typical Megalithic Menhir 7 Feet in Height Found at Basrur

A typical menhir is found at Basrur, a medieval historical city on the west coast of India. A huge stone slab about 7 feet in height from the ground level. It was curiously designed like a pregnancy. The local legends associated with these Menhirs mentioned them as pregnancy stones. But, we do not know whether they were built in memory of deceased pregnancy or not. The Menhir found at Basrur oriented to the north-west direction and was slightly leaning to the east. Basure or Basiru means pregnant in the local language, Kannada.

Basrur is a medieval trading city of Coastal Karnataka, known by various names like Basurepattana, Basurepura, Vasupura, Basaruru and studied by many Temples as a mark of its splendid wealth. Devi Temple of Basrur has special importance. It is the only Temple in India where the feast of Devi is performed once every 60 years. Mahalingeshwara Temple, Venkataramana Temple, Kote Anjaneya Temple, Tulu Eshwara Temple, Devi Temple, Ramachandra Temple, Umamaheshwara Temple, Bhairava Temple, Garadi, Sadananda Math are just a few surviving examples of its glorious past.

The Menhirs are upright standing stones of the Megalithic period. They were erected above the burial or near the burial as a memorial stone of the dead. They were dated between 1000 B.C. to 800 B.C. The discovery of a Menhir near Venkataramana Temple at Basrur pushed back its antiquity to the Megalithic period about 1000 B.C. Stylistic Menhir of Basrur has a close similarity with that of menhirs of Baise and Nilskal of the Shivamogga district, says Prof. Murugeshi T, Associate Professor, Dept of Ancient History and Archaeology MSRS College, Shirva in his press release today.

I am thankful to Muralidhar Hegade, Pradeep Basruru, Basruru Venkataramana Temple trustees for their kind service and help and my students of archaeology, Shreyas, Gowtham, Nagaraj, Karthik and Chandru participated in this discovery.

Submitted by: Prof. T. Murugeshi


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