Kudla’s Stray Dog ‘Pinky’ is Finalist in the PETA ‘Cutest Indian Dog Alive’ Contest

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Kudla’s Stray Dog ‘Pinky’ is Finalist in the PETA ‘Cutest Indian Dog Alive’ Contest

  • Kudla’s Stray Dog ‘Pinky’ is Finalist in the PETA ‘Cutest Indian Dog Alive’ Contest, which was rescued by Mangalorean Ms Jean Crasta in July 2017. PETA has pawed through hundreds of entries to pick the dogs they believe to be the best choices for PETA India’s 2018 Cutest Indian Dog Alive. Now, it’s up to you to help PETA India decide who we should choose as the winners. Click on the Link below to pick your favourite and VOTE FOR MANGALURU CUTIE ‘PINKY’ -VOTING WILL LAST ONLY UNTIL MIDNIGHT TODAY 25 AUGUST 2018 :

PETA India’s 2018 Cutest Indian Dog Contest.

Mangaluru: After Mangaluru’s Cat ‘Rani’ was the finalist in the “Cutest Rescued Cat Alive” contest held by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) in 2014, four years later we have yet another four-legged stray animal, which was rescued by a citizen of Mangaluru, and is one among final ten stray dogs among hundreds of entries selected in the PETA’s ‘India’s Seventh Annual Cutest Indian Dog Alive’ Contest.

In 2014, after sifting through hundreds of photographs of lovable rescued cats – as well as their rescue stories – the judges had selected Rani, whose guardian was Shalmali Jain of Mangaluru, as one of 10 finalists in PETA’s “India’s first Cutest Rescued Cat Alive” Contest. It is learnt that Rani was left to die outside Shalmali’s house, but Shalmali managed to rescue her before stray dogs got to her.

This year, in PETA’s ‘India’s Seventh Annual Cutest Indian Dog Alive’ Contest, a female around 2-year-old dog “Pinky” rescued by Ms Jean Crasta and which is under her care since July 2017 at her home, joining other four-legged animals at Jean’s house. Speaking to Team Mangalorean, Ms Jean Crasta said, ” It was raining heavily during the month of July 2017, and I saw this cute little puppy hiding near a construction site near Mangala Stadium, Urwa-Mangaluru. I couldn’t resist in taking this puppy home, so with a help of a street sweet corn seller, I was able to take this stray pup home. Since her toes and nose were pink I named her as ‘Pinky’. She is indeed a cute little stray dog, which has now been neutered and likes to play and run around in the compound happily. I feel happy that I provided ‘Pinky’ a new home full of freedom”.

Ms Jean Crasta, a resident of Mangaluru who has been educating and organizing various awareness programmes about Child Abuse and Animal Abuse from the last ten years, further said, “I kindly request the residents of Mangaluru to feed stray dogs, cats, birds and keep water in mud pots. Give them shelter during the rains and the heat. If you are able to care and adopt an Indian Desi dog or kittens please do but don’t cage and chain them for 24 hours. Make a shed or keep them in a covered balcony or portico. Remember they get scared of thunder, lightning, crackers and drum sounds, so keep them in at nights. Otherwise, they run away and get killed or lost. There is never a shortage of dogs and cats who would love to be someone’s new best friend, and there is no better place to find the perfect canine or feline companion than at your local animal shelter or on the street. Also, teach your kids to be kind to animals and they will grow up to be kind to humans too”.

PETA India is running the contest to urge prospective guardians to adopt a vulnerable cat from the streets or an animal shelter instead of buying kittens. Pet shops and breeders often keep animals in dismal conditions and contribute to the companion animal overpopulation crisis by churning out animals to sell. Animals purchased from pet shops are also often bought on impulse and discarded when buyers tire of them. PETA encourages people to get the companion animals in their communities sterilized, to sterilize their own animal companions and to choose to adopt animals from the street or a shelter instead of buying them from a breeder or a pet store.

Speaking to media, Dr Manilal Valliyate, CEO of PETA India said, “Pinky is one of the ten finalists after sifting through hundreds of photographs of stray dogs and going through their stories as to how they were rescued. Pinky is a lucky dog and she has returned the favour of being rescued by bringing much love and joy into her guardian’s life. We all should know that all rescued dogs are winners because they were saved by people who love them for who they are. What is the contest about? It’s time to champion the Indian community dog, so the contest makes the point that the kindest thing that a prospective guardian can do is to rescue a dog from the streets or an animal shelter. However, with this contest, PETA hopes to show the public how wonderful Indian community dogs are and to encourage their adoption since they are commonly abused, neglected, discarded or actively harmed. Are you an Indian dog fan? Why not take the pledge to adopt and never buy or breed dogs?”.

In conclusion, in my perspective, “By adopting a homeless Indian dog, people can bring joy into their lives while rescuing a dog from the dangers of living on the streets or a life spent languishing in a cage at an animal shelter. PETA encourages people to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or the street instead of buying one from a breeder or a pet store. When people buy dogs, it means one less good home is available to homeless dogs. There is a severe animal overpopulation crisis in India, including Mangaluru. Each year, countless dogs are left to languish in animal shelters or on the streets for lack of good homes. Street dogs are loving, loyal, resilient, robust and well-suited to the local climate. People with the time, money, love and patience to make a lifetime commitment to an animal can make an enormous difference by adopting an animal from a shelter or rescuing one from a perilous life on the street. It is irresponsible for anyone to support breeders when there are millions of homeless Indian dogs and cats who deserve a chance at a better life”.

The top 10 dogs selected in this contest are – two from Pune and the rest are from Surat, Pondicherry, Jammu, Nasik, Chandigarh Ajmer, Dehradun and Mangaluru. As per PETA, Brownie, from Pondicherry, who was only about a month old, had been abandoned in a busy street and was suffering from a skin disease when Shael took her to a veterinarian and then adopted her. Other owners too have inspiring stories to share. Bruno, whose mother had died when he was very small, had an injury on his stomach when Divisha adopted him. After receiving the necessary treatment, Bruno is now a healthy dog. The winner will be declared on August 29.

Voting will last Only until midnight today 25 August 2018 to pick your favourite dog, and PETA crown the winners on 29 August 2018. The lucky pup who is named the Cutest Indian Dog Alive will receive a first-place certificate and a “100% Desi Dog” doggie T-shirt, and his or her guardian will receive a “My dog is a rescue” T-shirt as well as a copy of Ingrid E Newkirk’s book Let’s Have a Dog Party. The second-place winner will receive a second-place certificate and a “100% Desi Dog” doggie T-shirt, and his or her guardian will receive a “My dog is a rescue” T-shirt. The third-place winner will receive a third-place certificate and a “100% Desi Dog” doggie T-shirt. All winners will appear in an upcoming issue of Animal Times, PETA India’s magazine for members.

PETA has pawed through twenty five of entries to pick the dogs they believe to be the best choices for PETA India’s 2018 Cutest Indian Dog Alive. Now, it’s up to you to help PETA India decide who we should choose as the winners. Click on the Link below to pick your favorite and VOTE FOR MANGALURU CUTIE ‘PINKY’, AND VOTING WILL LAST ONLY UNTIL MIDNIGHT TODAY 25 AUGUST 2018:

PETA India’s 2018 Cutest Indian Dog Contest.


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1 Comment

  1. It’s very unfortunate how the so-called ‘animal lovers’ are only focused on dogs and cats. If you truly and honestly care about animals and animal abuse, you would certainly stop eating meat and other animal products. I’ve cats and dog at home – but it would be hypocritical to only care about pets and call myself an ‘animal lover’. Oh well…

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